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Bacon's Heir

It could be said that growing up on a beautiful grass-fed cattle and honey farm in the coastal plains of Alabama planted the seeds of pork idealism in Bacon's Heir founder Brett Goodson. But could you really blame anyone for having some qualms with the typical processed, fatty and generally looked-down-upon pork rind? 

Brett simply decided to take the initiative to revolutionize this much-maligned snack. He didn't want to abandon the salty, tasty flavor of pork rinds, but he was also on a mission to rid them of the bottom-of-the-barrel meat that brought them down. It was at a dinner and game party with friends on a late autumn day that this mission—to improve the Chicharrón, or fried pork skin—came to light. At this party, Brett realized the perfect form of the Chicharrón: a light, fluffy crisp that distinctly resembled an innocent summer cloud. Pork Clouds were born. 

It didn't exactly happen overnight. A former mechanical engineer, Brett had flexed his innovation-muscles developing hybrid car batteries. Since then, the Atlanta, Georgia-based maker has switched from car chemistry to carnivore chemistry to revolutionize the pork rind game with his GMO-free, handmade, artisan Pork Clouds. An "exercise in minimalism," the Clouds contain just four ingredients and are made by melting the fat off of pork skin curing it in salt, drying it and cooking it in a special olive oil kettle cooking process for optimum fluffiness. They're so light and fluffy, Brett boasts that he's actually lost weight since it all began. 

Even the mightiest cumulus cloud can't claim it comes in multiple flavors like Pork Clouds do—Rosemary & Sea Salt, and Malabar Black Pepper. And the creativity doesn't stop there: Brett even utilizes the leftover olive oil to make an intriguing toiletry called, simply, "Pork Soap" (sorry, we don't sell that one). 

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